FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Media Contact: Maria Blackburn
410-735-6263 (voice)
410-735-6200 (fax)
mariablackburn@jhu.edu                                     


BALTIMORE August 15, 2013—Young scientists ages 13 to 18 with promising research ideas can now be awarded funding of up to $600 through a new annual competition sponsored by the Johns Hopkins Center for Talented Youth (CTY). CTY is establishing the CTY Cogito Research Awards to help offset the costs associated with conducting research in math and science for selected middle and high school students.  

“Many innovative projects never get off the ground because students don’t have the funds to buy microscopes or travel to conferences where they can connect with experts,” says Patricia Wallace, senior director of CTYOnline. “Some students might never even try to test their original hypotheses if they can’t afford to carry them out. The CTY Cogito Research Awards address that gap by making funding available to bright students with solid research ideas.”

The award is one of the benefits of membership to Cogito.org, CTY’s online community and website for middle and high school students interested in science and math. CTY will issue a call for entries on the Cogito site on Sept. 1, 2013. Up to 10 students who submit the most compelling, promising research proposals will be selected by a committee composed of Johns Hopkins CTY faculty from various math and science fields. The inaugural group of CTY Cogito Research Award winners will be announced on Dec. 31, 2013. 

Following their selection, each of the 2014 CTY Cogito Research Award winners will be paired with a mentor to support them through their research process. They will also blog about their projects on the Cogito site. “Students sharing what it’s like to do science, including their trials and tribulations, in a friendly virtual environment—that’s a big part of the Cogito mission,” says Kristi Birch, Cogito’s managing editor. “The CTY Cogito Research Awards will not only provide these students with financial assistance and mentoring, they will also connect them with a supportive online community of students interested in doing real-world science and math research.”

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About The Johns Hopkins University Center for Talented Youth (CTY)

A global leader in gifted education since 1979, CTY is focused on identifying academic talent in exceptional K-12 students and supporting their growth with summer and online courses, family programs, services, and resources specifically designed to meet their needs. Education Week called CTY “one of a set of remarkable nonpublic institutions dedicated to the discovery and nurture of the most talented young people for the highest levels of accomplishment.”


About Cogito.org

Since 2006, Cogito.org has showcased the work of middle and high school students from all over the world who are interested in math and science, and given these students a virtual place to “geek out” and interact with professional scientists and mathematicians. Cogito won the prestigious Science Prize for Online Resources in Education (SPORE) from Science magazine and its publisher, the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), in 2011. Cogito membership is available to all CTY students ages 13 to 18; Cogito also accepts member nominations from educators. To find out more, e-mail cogitocty@jhu.edu