Ian SchefflerWhen a CTY classmate challenged Ian Scheffler to solve Rubik's Cube in fewer than 20 seconds, he dismissed the task as impossible. But years later when a writing assignment lead him to the 2012 Rubik's Cube US National Championship—and a reunion with Toby Mao, his erstwhile CTY friend—Scheffler was drawn into the world of competitive Rubik's Cube solving.

According to Google's supercomputers, the maximum number of moves required to solve any of the 43,252,003,274,489,856,000 possible configurations of Rubik's Cube is 20—otherwise known as God’s Number. "You can spend a lot of time solving the Cube, there’s an elegance to it, like a math proof," explains Scheffler....Click here to read more.